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St. Luke & St. Simon Cyrene Episcopal Church—Rochester NY

A photo of Saint Luke and Saint Simon Cyrene Episcopal Church in Rochester
Phone: (585) 546-7730
Email: office@twosaints.org
Website: www.twosaints.org 

Ministry

What has been called prison ministry in the church has developed in a larger framework of reentry to community, and care for formerly imprisoned persons and their families. The social implications of the “big picture” are great too as they adversely affect entire large sections of the city. 

Three areas of activity have occupied Two Saints parishioners concerned with such prison reentry and aftercare for youths, men, and women with experiences of incarceration.

Communal Prayers

Communal prayers recognize the humanity and dignity of each imprisoned man, woman, and youth as well as of those reentering society. Services for them are definitely improving. Yet the whole area requires more resources and better service coordination to reduce recidivism, assist reentrants and families, and enhance public safety.

Individual Ministries

Some Two Saints members engage in individual ministries. Trained as a mentor by Judicial Process Commission, one counsels a Monroe County inmate. Another is website administrator and coordinates communications and research for SMART (Safer Monroe Area Reentry Team)

Turning Points Resource Center

Turning Points Resource Center (TPC) a service providing information for justice involved individuals and their families involved with New York State prisons and jails operated in the area around Rochester NY. TPC is located at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 350 Chili Avenue, in Rochester NY. If you have a family member who is currently in one of these facilities, or know of a person or family who is touched by incarceration, this center provides information you can use. 

A joint project of St. Luke’s and St. Simon Cyrene Episcopal Church, and St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, the TPC, in operation since November 2012, provides up-to-date information for justice involved individuals and their families before and during incarceration, as well as during the re-entry process back into the community. The name “Turning Points” was chosen in recognition that behavior leading to incarceration often occurs through multiple generations within families and due to systemic deficiencies. It is hoped that with access to the most appropriate services and support, these multi-generational cycles can be “turned around” and focused on positive behavior.